What is a colposcopy

What is a Colposcopy?

The question ‘what is a colposcopy’ is often posed by women either during their routine cervical screening or when they receive a result identifying some abnormal cells.  The colposcopy sometimes gets confused with a cervical screening (previously known as a pap smear). However, whilst the procedures are similar, they are not the same. They are both used by your doctor during examination of your cervix however they are performed at different stages of the process.

The Importance of Regular Cervical Screening

 

The cervical screening is a routine test to enable detection of the HPV virus and abnormal cells. It is one of the most effective ways to detect pre-cancerous changes of the cervix as well as cervical cancer. During a cervical screening a sample of cells will be taken for testing. 

Both the Department of Health in Australia and the Cancer Council of Australia recommend women 25 and older should be screened every 5 years.

What is a Colposcopy?

What is a colposcopy

The question ‘what is a colposcopy’ is often posed by women either during their routine cervical screening or when they receive a result identifying some abnormal cells.  The colposcopy sometimes gets confused with a cervical screening (previously known as a pap smear). However, whilst the procedures are similar, they are not the same. They are both used by your doctor during examination of your cervix however they are performed at different stages of the process.

The Importance of Regular Cervical Screening

 

The cervical screening is a routine test to enable detection of the HPV virus and abnormal cells. It is one of the most effective ways to detect pre-cancerous changes of the cervix as well as cervical cancer. During a cervical screening a sample of cells will be taken for testing. 

Both the Department of Health in Australia and the Cancer Council of Australia recommend women 25 and older should be screened every 5 years.

Self-Collection: Changes to cervical Screening from July 2022

 

Did you know there’s been a major update to the National Cervical Screening Test program in Australia. From 1st July 2022, women will be offered self-collection under the supervision of a healthcare professional. 

Since the introduction of cervical screening in 1991 the rates of cervical cancer have halved. The aim of the changes is to ensure that more women have access to the program, particularly those who may be underscreened. 

Self-collection is when a woman takes her own sample for cervical screening in a healthcare setting. The sample is taken with a cotton swab and is done under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

what is a colposcopy research

When a Colposcopy Might Be Required

 

If the HPV virus and abnormal cells are detected from your cervical screening the next step is a colposcopy, which can help confirm and diagnose potential problems. If this is the case for you, you might like to know what is a colposcopy exactly?

During a colposcopy, a special instrument called a colposcope is used to give your doctor a highly magnified view of the tissues that make up your cervix. As with a cervical screening, a speculum is used to give a clear view of the cervix. This is to allow your gynaecologist to gather further information following your test results to make a proper diagnosis and discuss next steps for treatment.

If you have any questions before a colposcopy, you should discuss them with your doctor.

 

Please also feel free to contact Dr Kieren Wilson’s rooms if you would like to discuss your next cervical screening or your screening results. You can email us on info@drkierenwilson.com.au or call 02 9923 4222.

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