Endemetriosis-symptoms

The most common endometriosis symptoms

Whilst some pelvic pain during menstrual periods is normal, endometriosis symptoms are typically far more painful than usual. This pain may also increase over time.

Endometriosis occurs when some of the cells similar to those that line the uterus grow in other parts of the body. They usually grow in the pelvis but can also move to other parts of the body.

Even though they are not in the uterus, these cells still respond to messages from the ovaries. As with the uterus lining, the endometriosis tissue thickens  every month and then bleeds during a period. Over time, this process can lead to inflammation and scarring, and can cause organs to stick together.

The most common endometriosis symptoms

Endemetriosis-symptoms

Whilst some pelvic pain during menstrual periods is normal, endometriosis symptoms are typically far more painful than usual. This pain may also increase over time.

Endometriosis occurs when some of the cells similar to those that line the uterus grow in other parts of the body. They usually grow in the pelvis but can also move to other parts of the body.

Even though they are not in the uterus, these cells still respond to messages from the ovaries. As with the uterus lining, the endometriosis tissue thickens  every month and then bleeds during a period. Over time, this process can lead to inflammation and scarring, and can cause organs to stick together.

Some of the most common endometriosis symptoms

• Painful periods
Pelvic pain and cramping may begin before and extend several days into a menstrual period. You may also have lower back and abdominal pain.

• Pain with bowel movements or passing urine
You’re most likely to experience these symptoms during a menstrual period.

• Excessive bleeding
Heavy menstrual periods or bleeding between periods.

• Infertility
Difficulty becoming pregnant.

• Bloating
Feeling bloated, both with and without pain or discomfort.

• Fatigue
Feeling tired, especially around the time of your period.

• Anxiety
Having anxiety or depression related to the pain and impact on wellbeing.

• Diarrhea or constipation

• Nausea
Feeling nauseous especially during menstrual periods.

When do endometriosis symptoms develop?

Endometriosis usually develops several years after the onset of menstruation (menarche).  About 1 in 9 women in Australia develop endometriosis by their 40s. Signs and symptoms of endometriosis may temporarily improve with pregnancy and may go away completely with menopause, unless you’re taking hormone therapy .

Endemetriosis-symptoms

What to do if you experience endometriosis symptoms

Endometriosis symptoms can vary and are not always an indication of the severity of the condition. For many suffers, it impacts quality of life and emotional wellbeing, and can have a detrimental effect on mental health. There can also be long-term impacts resulting from endometriosis including infertility and and chronic pelvic pain.

If you believe you are suffering any symptoms that may be linked to endometriosis, it’s important to discuss this with a gynaecologist as soon as possible. The first step is to investigate and confirm the diagnosis, and then develop a plan to manage the condition. Whilst there is no cure for endometriosis, there are effective treatments that may relieve the symptoms.

 

If you’d like to discuss any gynaecological concerns or endometriosis symptoms specifically, please feel free to contact Dr Kieren Wilson’s rooms for more information and to arrange a consultation. Email us on info@drkierenwilson.com.au or call 02 9923 4222.

 

References:

The Mayo Clinic
Health Direct
Endometriosis Australia

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